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Asia Unbound

CFR fellows and other experts assess the latest issues emerging in Asia today.

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Trade ministers and delegates from the remaining members of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) attend the TPP Ministerial Meeting during the APEC 2017 in Da Nang, Vietnam, November 9, 2017. Na Son Nguyen/Reuters

The Alternative Paths of Multilateral Trade Deals in Asia

Perusing the coverage of President Donald J. Trump’s first ten months in office, a reader could easily conclude that the global trading system, which has been in existence essentially since 1945, is on the verge of collapse. Trump himself frequently talks about trade in a way that sounds more like mercantilist princes of the sixteenth century, or the economist nationalists of the 1930s, than all the post–World War II presidents of the United States.  Read More

November 17, 2017

South Korea
The Strategy Behind South Korea’s Outreach to Southeast Asia

On November 9, South Korean President Moon Jae-in unveiled his “New Southern Policy,” aimed at deepening relations with the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Moon’s announcement, made on a state visit to Indonesia, came amid a flurry of diplomatic activity in the region ahead of the latest ASEAN summit in the Philippines and U.S. President Donald Trump’s trip to Asia.

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November 16, 2017

India
Narendra Modi Is Really Popular in India

In a newly released public opinion survey, the Pew Research Center finds that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi continues to enjoy sky-high approval ratings three years after his government came to power. An astronomical 88 percent of those surveyed held a favorable view of him, up from a dip to 81 percent in 2016, and one point above 2015’s favorability rating of 87 percent.

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November 16, 2017

U.S. Foreign Policy
Podcast: A Force So Swift

Dean Acheson. Mao Zedong. Harry Truman. Chiang Kai-Shek. All were significant players during one of China’s most pivotal years.  In 1949, Mao’s Communist army swept across the country, defeating the Nationalists and establishing the People’s Republic of China. The aftermath of the Communist Revolution transformed American policy towards Asia—laying the groundwork for subsequent wars and forcing U.S. statesmen to respond to threats both at home and abroad.

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